Unguja is the main island of Zanzibar. Unguja is well-known for historical Stone Town, beautiful beaches and nature, both on-land and the surrounding coral reefs. There is a variety of different beach destinations, where everyone can find their own preferable choice.

Unguja is the home for most of Zanzibar’s population. Nowadays Stone Town is the main port and commercial centre of the whole Zanzibar. It also hosts many cultural events and festivals.

Unguja is very easy to reach. Many international flight companies fly to Zanzibar Airport close to Stone Town. There are also local flights from Dar es Salaam, Kilimanjaro, Nairobi and Mombasa. Many travelers coming from mainland Tanzania prefer to take a passenger ferry – it takes less than 2 hours. Please ask for more advice.

Unguja (also referred to as Zanzibar Island or simply Zanzibar, in Ancient Greek Menuthias, Μενουθιάς – as mentioned in The Periplus of the Erythraean Sea) is the largest and most populated island of the Zanzibar archipelago, in Tanzania.

Unguja is a hilly island, about 85 kilometres (53 miles) long (north-south) and 30 kilometres (19 miles) wide (east-west) at its widest, with an overall area of about 1,666 square kilometres (643 square miles). It is located in the southern half of the Zanzibar Archipelago, in the Indian Ocean, about 59 kilometres (37 mi) south of the second largest island of the archipelago, Pemba. Unguja and mainland Tanzania are separated by the Zanzibar Channel.

Unguja is surrounded by a number of smaller islands and islets, with only two of them, Tumbatu and Uzi, being inhabited. Other minor islands around Unguja include Bawe, Chapwani, Changuu, Chumbe, Kizingo, Kwale, Latham, Mautani, Miwi, Mnemba, Mwana wa Mwana, Nianembe, Popo, Pungume, and Ukanga.

Unguja is the island of the Zanzibar Archipelago that has the most developed tourism industry. This accounts for a substantial part of Unguja’s economy. Agriculture (including the production of spices such as cloves) and fishing are other relevant activities. All along the east coast, most villages also rely on seaweed farming.